My Last Days in Konstanz: Part 3

In case you missed the previous posts in this series, you can go back and read Part 1 and Part 2.

In the first post of this series I had mentioned going to Hus-Haus, a museum in the city center that is all about Johannes Hus, a Christian reformer who was imprisoned and later burned at the stake in Konstanz.

Today, I want to share two more museums and another historical church with you that are perfect for a rainy day in Konstanz. I don’t usually go to museums when I travel. I rather prefer to be out and about most of the time. However, given the time and right circumstances, I think visiting a museum is a good way to pass the time and learn quite a bit, especially if you’re interested in history.

Rosgarten Museum

The Rosgarten Museum is also located in the old city center of Konstanz and features the history of the city as well as the surrounding region. This is a good one to visit on Wednesday afternoons after 2pm or on the first Sunday of the month when they offer free admission. Otherwise, it’s still a quite low price at only €3 per person or half that for students and children. Be aware though, photos are not permitted (or at least they weren’t in 2017 when I last visited).

After arriving, I stored my things in a locker (bags are not permitted in the museum), and took a look around. The age of the building itself lends quite a lot to the exhibits. While looking at objects that are hundreds of years old, I got the feeling that they could have even been used in the very rooms where I stood. The woods floors, intricate paneling, and stone window frames portray a lively sense of time compared to the sterile feeling I often get in modern museums.

Before I went, I knew that the museum highlights Konstanz in the Middle Ages, how the city developed, Reformation and Counter-Reformation times in Konstanz, and art from the 18th and 19th centuries.

What I was surprised to find (I had missed it on the website and never heard about it) was a section in the upper levels all about Konstanz in the era of National Socialism. I was somewhat surprised to come around the corner and see all these items with Nazi symbolism. Seeing photos of areas of Konstanz that I know well with Swastikas was rather surreal.

Germany has done a lot of work in the reconciliation process since the times of Hitler, but it’s not something that I think about every day. I am usually focused on studying / work, cooking meals, enjoying myself out in nature, and generally living my life. Being confronted with the fact that the place where I had been living for two years was one site where Nazis oppressed and eventually arrested Jews and others that they claimed were evil is a different feeling. Seeing the stumbling stones always leaves me with an odd feeling, but seeing the photos and Nazi paraphernalia was like looking through a window into the past.

I am probably more cognizant than others when it comes to putting where I am into historical context. It gives me a thrill to think about who might have been in the places I visit, what the buildings may have looked like, and how people may have lived their lives hundreds of years ago. Aligning that same historical context with such a dark period of recent history instead feels like a cold stone dropping into your stomach.

Dreifaltigkeitskirche

Dreifaltigkeitskirche, or “Church of the Holy Trinity” in English, is just down the way from the Rosgarten Museum. It was originally built in 1268, with Baroque styling added in 1740.

If you like the paintings and Baroque styling, then you’ll definitely enjoy stepping into this church.

My tastes run a bit different, and what fascinated me was the peaks at the edge of the structure that allowed for a glimpse down into the earlier history of the church. There is a sort of gap where you can look down and see the original stone, and a headstone to up the contrast the the sophistication of the rest of the interior.

I think I spent almost as much time checking out this gap as I did looking over the rest of the interior. I may be odd, but to each his own.

Archaeologisches Landesmuseum Baden-Wuerttemberg

The final place I’d like to share with you today is one that I had looked at from the bus stop across the way for two years. It wasn’t until my last week that I decided I was actually going to enter.

The Archaeologisches Landesmuseum is located near the bridge where the Rhine meets the Bodensee next to the old city center. I had always been a bit curious based only on the little lego-style statue standing guard on top.

If you’re interested in going here, be warned that this museum can easily eat up an entire day of your time. At €6 for the entrance fee, it’s a steal. Just take some water to stay hydrated. If you want to learn more about the museum, check out their website.

Now, to some highlights!

The area of the museum that I was always looking at from the bus stop was actually one of the first that I visited. Inside, there was information about the boats used on the Bodensee and trading around the lake hundreds of years ago.

If you were traveling by something that looked like a canoe, I hope that you went on a day with good weather. That canoe did not look too big. Granted, it was a quite worn down one as it was so old. I still wonder how it managed to carry people, let alone all of the goods that they wanted to trade.

More fascinating in the ships that came later. For some reason, I did not imagine that there was any kind of larger boat on the Bodensee until more recent history, but of course there was.

Model for reference
Some of the recovered hull, as I couldn’t manage to fit the whole thing into one photo

I have a bit of a phobia when it comes to bodies of water. I’m not so sure that I would have wanted to take a ride on this ship either. It’s amazing though looking at the ship and thinking about how they built it.

If you’re wondering what they were able to transport in this ship, here’s a rather large barrel that perhaps carried wine. Doesn’t exactly look watertight anymore though.

Moving further through the museum, I came to an exhibit about early settlements (approximately 3500 BCE) on the lake and Rhine River in the area. They used to build their homes over the water. If you’re traveling around the Bodensee, there’s even a life-size model that tourists can visit today.

Pizza anyone?
Fashion, or something like it

Of course, it’s Germany so there was also quite some exhibits about more recent times, from when the Romans were in the region up to medieval times.

Reconstructed kiln

Some of my favorites were the exhibits about life in Konstanz during the medieval ages.

Dice from the medieval era
A medieval toilet seat, lest you think they were uncivilized back then

Hopefully you’re at least mildly entertained by now, so I’ll end it there. Really though, there’s plenty to do if you find yourself on a rainy day in Konstanz. I’d recommend visiting all three if you have the time and are interested in history.

Cheers!

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